Archives For Culture

interstellar-movie

It could be argued that Interstellar is a product of how far humanity has come. In his ninth feature film, Christopher Nolan stretches technology to a near breaking point, producing a visceral absorption of sight and awe-producing sound (and silence). Narratively speaking, Interstellar also presents human technology at its highest heights, it’s outermost point of human evolution. Man can go farther than they have ever gone before, reaching the ends of the galaxy, and more. Just like technological advancement isn’t what keeps its characters scratching and crawling for life, Interstellar is a humanistic film grasping for something more. It pushes us to look to the stars. And when we do, we’ll find something bigger than ourselves.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE AT CHRIST AND POP CULTURE

wades_wisdom_humor_comedy_funny

I can’t keep up with Halloween costumes anymore. It has gotten out of control. I miss the days when you could celebrate in a simple, homely ensemble—maybe even go as the Ghostbusters if you were feeling fancy and free. Now, one has to be incredibly and specifically creative or they won’t get noticed at all. Continue Reading…

FURY-Brad-Pitt

In Fury’s opening scene, Brad Pitt stabs a German officer in the eye. This act of brutality makes two important statements about David Ayer’s new film. First, Fury isn’t for the squeamish—those uncomfortable with such displays of brutality should probably sit this one out. Second, Fury won’t be a glossy, glorified homage to the “greatest generation”…READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE.

nicolas-cage-left-behindI sincerely believe there’s a good narrative hidden somewhere in the Left Behind series. A fan of rapture theology or not, the idea of an event where Christians are instantly transported to heaven has an air of intrigue to it. How will the world recover from the fallout? Even more so, how will those not taken live with the inevitable feeling of rejection? Then there’s the apocalyptic element; a window into a world tearing itself apart. Continue Reading…

Believe Me Slide

I’ve been asked multiple times about Believe Me, a new film hitting theaters and video on demand tomorrow. Is it a Christian film? Does it trash the faith or have some sort of redeeming quality to it all?

I had a chance to view an early screening of Believe Me and later interview Will Bakke, the film’s director. It was a great conversation and I think it’ll answer some of your questions. YOU CAN READ THE INTERVIEW HERE

Taylor-swift-shake-it-off

Last year, I took some time to dissect Taylor Swift’s song, 22. It’s upbeat, fun, and a reflection of the darkness surrounding Taylor’s life.

What?!

Yes. 22 is more than just a catchy tune for teenagers driving to prom. It bleeds with clear allusions to failed relationships, sorrow, and, of course, an episode of The Twilight Zone. If you haven’t had a chance to read my piece, you can do so here.

Today, I’m going further down the rabbit hole by critically analyzing Taylor’s (we’re on a first name basis) new song, Shake It Off. Continue Reading…

father-day-dad-son

My son Weston

This Sunday is my first Father’s Day. It’s difficult to believe Weston will be a year old next month. Pretty soon he’ll be able to bring me the television remote and mow the lawn when I need to rest up for dinner. I think I’ll teach him how to bake cookies too. You never know when you’ll need a skill like baking cookies. Oh wait, yes I do. Every single day. Continue Reading…

cage-left-behind

Years ago, a minister’s widow gave me her late husband’s library. I still remember the books covering my office floor, leaving a small trail of carpet from the door to the desk. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t excited to start thumbing through the old volumes. I think libraries can teach us a good deal about a person. They reflect what we value, what we yearn for. Books are an echo of our imaginations and desires. Continue Reading…

Godzilla: Human and Divine

Wade —  May 22, 2014

godzilla-picture

Godzilla (2014) – Legendary Pictures

After I watched Monsters—director Gareth Edwards’ first feature-length film—I couldn’t stop gushing over it. “Have you seen Monsters?” I would ask a friend.

“When I was seven, I thought I saw one hiding under my bed,” was usually their reply. 

“No, the movie Monsters.”

“The one with Mike and Sulley?” Continue Reading…

x-men-group

The X-Men film franchise begins at a rain-soaked Nazi concentration camp during World War II. In the midst of a large crowd walks a young Jewish boy. His dark coat bears the Star of David, the badge’s yellow color contrasting against the dreary hues of the compound. As the boy is torn from his parents, he mysteriously emits a powerful magnetic force, bending the camp gate. The chaotic moment reaches a breaking point when the child, later known as Magneto, is knocked unconscious.

This introductory scene—expanded in X-Men: First Class—encapsulates the thematic mood of the entire franchise. At its core, the X-Men cinematic universe is more than a slab of blockbuster meat to a slew of hungry consumers. It’s a probing commentary on social subjugation, equality, and discrimination…READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE.