Archives For God

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If you grew up in a Christian home during the last thirty years, you’re a member of an exclusive clique. You lived through McGee and Me’s tornado episode, survived a youth group game that required drinking a gallon of milk, and even weathered the Newsboys’ disco phase. Remember the day you accidentally ripped your Amy Grant poster? Some tragedies are too difficult to bear.

Christian culture possesses a unique attachment for its members, and judging by the amount of nostalgia-centric artifacts surging in popularity, we can’t seem to get enough of it…

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Before I could offer any advice, he spouted off a list of reasons why it was OK for him to rent a hotel room on prom night. He made sure to be safe. He and his girlfriend were legal adults. He had done it before, and his emotional health seemed just fine.

I heard these excuses from a student in my youth group, a student I was supposed to be counseling. I wish I could tell you I said something that changed his mind, but I only changed the subject. That day, I realized the way I talked (and thought) about sin needed more than a makeover. It needed a renovation. In the past, I only spoke to the personal, physical consequences of sin—broken relationships, legal trouble, STDs, etc.—and my students noticed. Individualism had sneaked into my belief system, constructing obedience into a selfish statue of personal comfort. I needed a better answer than, “Sin will ruin your life.”

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faith-belief-bible

A few Easters ago, I lectured on the evidence for the resurrection of Jesus. At the end of my talk, a woman chastised me in front of the group. “It doesn’t matter what theologians, scholars, or logic says. All that matters is the Bible.” Work that statement out as you may, but I think the main thrust of it was, “You just have to believe.” Continue Reading…

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I never expected what losing my dad would do to me. Some days, I don’t want to pull the covers off. Some days, I don’t want to talk to anyone. Some days, I simply want to watch television, scrolling through Netflix until I find a story that takes me to another world.

This isn’t the first time I’ve felt this weight, but it’s definitely the most poignant. Don’t think you have to lose a loved one for depression to be justified. Grief comes in many sizes; some big, some small enough to fit into a mailbox. Seasons like these make worshiping God feel undesirable, even complex. Yet, for all our preconceived ideas of what worshiping God is, I was reminded of a line written by my friend Alan: “Some days, rising out of bed is a great act of worship.” Honoring God can be as meager and rural as lifting our head off the pillow in the morning. Continue Reading…

My Grief, Observed

Wade —  January 10, 2015

grief-loss-God

As I write this, it’s been a month, to the day—nearly minute—that my father passed away. Last night, I dreamed about the evening he died. I think that makes two times in the last week. It wasn’t an oddly exaggerated dream like so many dreams are. It was actually fairly close to what happened that night. Continue Reading…

miracle-vision-map

I think our definition of “miracle” is often too small, too limited, and even a bit lazy. Here’s why. Continue Reading…

interstellar-movie

It could be argued that Interstellar is a product of how far humanity has come. In his ninth feature film, Christopher Nolan stretches technology to a near breaking point, producing a visceral absorption of sight and awe-producing sound (and silence). Narratively speaking, Interstellar also presents human technology at its highest heights, it’s outermost point of human evolution. Man can go farther than they have ever gone before, reaching the ends of the galaxy, and more. Just like technological advancement isn’t what keeps its characters scratching and crawling for life, Interstellar is a humanistic film grasping for something more. It pushes us to look to the stars. And when we do, we’ll find something bigger than ourselves.

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FURY-Brad-Pitt

In Fury’s opening scene, Brad Pitt stabs a German officer in the eye. This act of brutality makes two important statements about David Ayer’s new film. First, Fury isn’t for the squeamish—those uncomfortable with such displays of brutality should probably sit this one out. Second, Fury won’t be a glossy, glorified homage to the “greatest generation”…READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE.

Hook-robin-williams-death

Hearing about the death of a celebrity is an odd, sometimes crippling feeling. Sure, we might not know them, but we know them. In the case of Robin Williams, they might even be a large part of our life. Continue Reading…

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Boyhood – IFC Films

When I was seventeen, my dad took me to a Houston Astros game. Roger Clemens was making his first start for the team. The bright lights lit up the field as the sun dipped under the skyline. I remember the event being sold-out. I remember eating a hot dog. Continue Reading…